In a recent unpublished decision, In the Matter of Spill Fund Lien, DJ No. 129570-02, the Appellate Division held that the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”), through the Spill Fund Administrator (the “Administrator”), could file a Spill Act lien against the property of a person in any way responsible for a discharged hazardous substance (“person in any way responsible”). The court also found that NJDEP’s “lien contest” guidance, the procedure for challenging Spill Act liens, satisfied procedural due process requirements. This decision removes a potential ground for challenging Spill Act liens, expands the universe of persons against whom a Spill Act lien can be filed, and may even expand the universe of persons against whom NJDEP can level treble damages claims.
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The United States 8th Circuit Court of Appeals recently decided that a tire company and its affiliate could be held liable under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act at 42 U.S.C. § 9601 et seq. (“CERCLA”) for selling property knowing that the contaminated buildings thereon would be demolished.  Dico, Inc. (“Dico”) owned

On April 1, 2019, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”) proposed drinking water standards (known as maximum contaminant levels, or MCLs) for two PFAS – 14 parts per trillion (“ppt”) for PFOA and 13 ppt for PFOS. If the rule is promulgated, it will set the limit for the amount of each substance

On March 25, 2019, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“DEP”) issued a Statewide PFAS Directive to a number of companies associated with the manufacture of poly- and perfluoroalkyl chemicals (“PFAS” which includes PFNA, PFOA and PFOS and other substances) and their replacement compounds.  Pursuant to the Directive, these companies are to reimburse DEP’s

New Jersey continues to lead the country in the effort to regulate so-called “Forever Chemicals,” the family of chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (“PFAS”) found to be prevalent in drinking water supplies around the country due to their high solubility, mobility and persistence in water.  PFAS are found in many household products, and